Bill

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  • in reply to: Portholes windows for better ventilation #3036
    Bill
    Participant

    Sorry I haven’t responded to requests for a while so hopefully I’ll try and cover them now. I’ve had trouble in locating a receipt for these port holes but in looking again on line I believe they came from “Marine Depot”. Stainless rectangular 4”x10” 22°angled with spigot for $175, maybe you can find it for less by looking around. They are installed right side up and as such will allow water to run off to the outside.I did make a rotating catch to hold them in the full open position but the same can be achieved by tightening the hinge screws. They have held up well being SS and they do come with SS screens but are too loose to trust so I have used some stainless tape to make sure they don’t fall out on the road. The hardest part of the installation was the rectangular wooden ring 1” thick, difficult because it’s bottom had to have the 22° slope and I had already installed my 1” insulation, by the way I have now painted the interior insulation a light green as the dark gray was making the interior too dark. The added ventilation is allowing me to enjoy a cross wind when available has made a big difference. Hope this covers all of the questions.
    Bill

    in reply to: Varnish tricks #2295
    Bill
    Participant

    I agree with CW in cleaning the surface with alcohol and not only for the varnish but for the coats of epoxy that go down before the varnish. I built mine during the last winter in my garage heated by an unvented gas heater. All went well until the last coat of epoxy when it was below freezing and the heater was running a lot. The finished last coat when hard was showing signs of not adhering and could be peeled off in places, none of this was the case with previous coats. I finally called the supplier of the epoxy and he at first was stumped. Finally we decided it was the unvented heater leaving a slight film of soot or oil on the epoxy surface. After sanding down the last epoxy coat to the previous one we did the folling. We heated the garage to a mid 70 range for half a day and then opened all the doors and windows to flush out the contaminated air quickly and quickly closed up leaving the gas heater off but a small electric heater on. We then washed down the whole surface with alcohol and applied the last coat of epoxy, problem solved.
    Some tricks with varnish. You can try and cut down on the amount of oxygen that is in a used can of varnish by keeping the remaining varnish in a smaller container with as little air as possible, or you can buy a can of inert gas to use to replace all of the oxygenated air in the partially used varnish can. Lastly you can just cut out the thin skin layer in the varnish can and throw it away and then use the recommended thinner for the varnish to return to a desired viscosity. Trick I used for appying varnish. I thinned the varnish just enough to flow better when using a brush but here is how I applied it. I rolled out a small enough area to still be able to smooth it out with a brush before it got too firm then returned with the roller to do the next adacent area. The result leaves a glass like finish with no apparent runs. You can also use Penetrol as an additive to the varnish to make it flow better but do a test to make sure it’s comparable with the oil base varnish you are using. Hope this helps.

    in reply to: Decoration #2162
    Bill
    Participant

    Fantastic, wish I was as talented in the artist area.

    Bill

    in reply to: Varnish Interior? #2161
    Bill
    Participant

    I varnished my whole interior but I don’t recommend doing any varnish where you will be using contact cement that is not water base for attaching insulation. I did so with a solvent based contact cement and it lifted and bubbled varnish up wherever it was applied. The insulation held fine but whate a waste of expensive varnish.

    in reply to: Cabin storage #1649
    Bill
    Participant

    Sorry Apkley it took so long to ans your question. Like I said I used cardboard from the shipment packing to make a prototype and made sure it fit so as not to deal with fitting a glued up insert. I found a supplier to purchase some extra okoume plywood. The trim around the openings are water oak as is the molding below them. Those rings were cut out of a single board and then routed to fit as well as rounded off. I made a form to shape them to fit the curve and sandwiched them in it one at a time after steaming them, just used a dutchoven with a small colander under the wood to keep it out of the boiling water for about 10 min. You should make the form  have a slightly sharper than you need curve to allow for some spring back. The molding was also steam bent but in a 4” pvc pipe connected to a teakettle spout. Just make sure to quickly apply the shape desearded shape as all ability to maintain shaping leaves quickly as it cools and ware gloves. The curve for the cabinet is easy as the plywood bends easily and stitch and glue works well there, 1/4” thickness is more than strong enough and once epoxy and some fiberglass is added to some inside corners it all becomes very rigged just make sure you work on a large flat surface to prevent any warp once finished. I think I used 4 nuts and bolts to fasten it to the bulkhead and this allows me to remove it if needed in the future. Good luck.

    Bill

    in reply to: Blank vent solution #1412
    Bill
    Participant

    Comccoy, sorry you had this trouble, I should have given more info on this problem. I wanted less friction from the nylon lock nut and was aware of sharp edges causing your problem. Before gluing the nuts in place I tested and worked them in a vice on my bench first. First I used a fine stone on my grinder to chanfer the cut end and had a nut on before I cut it to length. I then removed the nut to clean the cut threads. Next I put the nylon lock nut in the vice and ran a tap of the same thread size through it with my small drill reversing it a few times. I then used a small drop of lub on threads to ease the friction and made sure no lub ended on the part of the nut where it was to be glued. Took a lot of time but it did avoid any jamming. Don’t know if I mentioned it but my first idea was to thread the extra length of door rod I had left over rather than buy some ss threaded rod because it was the correct dia. Try as I might I was not able to cut threads because the ss galled up in the die every time, ss is very touchy to machine.

    Bill

    in reply to: Insulation and Below Freezing Temps #1392
    Bill
    Participant

    Kevin, I was thinking of a heater a while back but have decided at least for a while to forego it for the time being. I live in the South on the island Ocracoke and for local use or heading up North in warm months I haven’t really needed more than what I now use. Before this CLC teardrop I built a classic TD out of birch plywood for my daughter who lives in Park City Utah. We share it usually in October or May and she uses it all but the really cold months. It’s not insulated but it’s bigest problem is sweating inside in cold weather when camping at 5,000’ or greater where the night become very cold. That teardrop as well as the CLC one demand that you have ventilation when inside and of course when sleeping. In the second year of use she and her husband had it closed up tight on a cold night in the 20* range and woke up gasping for air before opening a vent some. That said what we do now on cold nights is sleep in long under ware with a light ski beanie. She has a thick feather comforter to pull up and get under. If that is not enough add a 30* down bag. You said you were considering something electric and if you will have 120v at hand you have a lot of options from an electric blanket to a very small safe heater. That has never been an option for us as we go off the grid. The best heater I’ve found runs on propane and a low current draw electric circulating fan. Propex HS2211 is what I found and from what I’ve read it’s safe and mounted underneath. It’s not cheap, $825 but from what I’ve read I would trust it. It’s web page offers a lot of information and I don’t think “it’s made in China”. I would post a picture but this site is so bad that I usually loose everything whenever I attempt and no help fron their webmaster.

    Bill

    in reply to: Blank vent solution #1367
    Bill
    Participant

    Comccoy, from what I read it looks like you left out the white backing plate. I would worry about doing this at least on the front vents. These two don’t slant downward and if water is to run down to the bottom black portion of the opening it will enter the cabin. A sealed white deflector overhangs the black part and keeps the water behind the opening all around. Even if your rubber seal stops water when closed when open it most likely will enter whenever open driving or at rest. The thicker rubber seal along with the white deflector in your case should prevent this if it appears to be a problem.
    Bill

    in reply to: Galley hatch locks #1295
    Bill
    Participant

    Hi Mike, about 5 years ago I built my first teardrop for my daughter and I used two lock handles rather than one. Those worked like a car door, as you pushed down the spring loaded latched itself. After using it I wished I had of done the one center located handle with arms going to either side, it would have worked there but not on this galley unless you grew a third hand or had a helper whenever latching it down. This galley is very flexible and has piston lifts working against you. Both edges would need to be held down in alignment at the same time for a tight compressed seal before you could turn the handle to lock it down. Another consideration is the strength of lift in the pistons might not be strong enough to support all that extra weight. For my daughters I used old type mechanisms like very old cars. Lift it up and it goes into a lock position, lift again and it unlocks and gravity is your friend to close it. By the way, I wanted to mount a solar panel on that hatch but due to weight I also had to nix that idea. Hope this helps.
    Bill

    in reply to: Blank vent solution #1294
    Bill
    Participant

    Hi Comccoy, sorry I did not ans soooner. As to the length, what I did and not keep a record of is take measurements as best I could and then cut the rod about an inch longer than needed. Then I put it together and remeasured and than cut. If I were to do it again I would just use the whole rod and assemble everything except the small knob. Than hold the knob up against it, allow no more than 1″ of exposed thread when the vent is down and sealed and the rod is long enough to reach the other side of the knob, about another inch. Nick the rod to mark it, remove it and cut it to length.
    The knobs don’t appear to snag on anything, but might depending on how frisky one is. What does appear to be a possible snag canadate is the setscrew I put in on one to prevent it from coming loose. Like Diving Duck the SS was a *^%#€ to drill in place and I was afraid to unscrew it using the glued on vent cap and not wanting to take a chance of the 4200 breaking loose. Again if I did it over I would have placed it in a drillpress not tried it in place. Another afterthought would be to make the rod long enough to extend past and out of the other side of the knob and then sandwich the knob between two locknuts, I think DD did something like this.
    Bill

    in reply to: Chocks & Leveling #1191
    Bill
    Participant

    The first teardrop I built for my daughter was fron scratch and I bought a small bubble level and placed it on the galley floor. I welded two jacks to the rear of the frame that would just flip down when released and then a short steel bar would fit in to jack up them individually. The first thing that happened while taking it cross country to deliver it to Utah was the jacks would free themselves and drag on the highway luckily nothing bad happened and I secured them with a line to make sure they would stay in place. Next when using them in a very uneven place we ran into a second problem with trying to lower them before breaking camp. There was not enough room to insert the rod in the hole to lower it back as the bottom was too close. Now they are kind of tied up permanently. Now what she does is rotate the teardrop to level it port and starboard and finish up front and rear with the front wheel Jack, you will hit a level by rotating. As for blocks we always seem to find enough rocks in the North West.

    in reply to: Cabin lighting? #1166
    Bill
    Participant

    I did much the same but also ran some blue strip LEDs in the cabin behind the the cabin shelf and another blue string in the galley between the galley floor and back of the hatch and placed them on dimmers. My gooseneck so already have built in dimmers.

    in reply to: Blank vent solution #1121
    Bill
    Participant

    I’ve had a little trouble with the knobs from Rockler loosing up as the metal part of the Rockler is aluminum and strips out if the set screw is tightened real hard. I ended up drilling through the knob and 5/16 rod and inserting a 6/32 bolt and lock nut and this solved the problem. This would have been easier if done pre installation.
    Bill

    in reply to: Blank vent solution #1103
    Bill
    Participant

    Diving Duck, the 3m 4200 sticks well as long as the surface is not oily, it’s a marine sealant, they also make a 5200 that also never hardens but needs to be sanded or scraped away to remove and it is said should not be used by a novice unless they have a note from their mother, the 4200 is a little more forgiving. The down side is its not cheap nor is 5200 and once opened must used in 24 hrs or the rest of the tube becomes unusable. If you decide to use it get the fast set up one even that one takes a day or so to set up and they also come in black as well as white but black is a little harder to locate.

    in reply to: Blank vent solution #1102
    Bill
    Participant

    Ken, I mounted the lights in the hole in the top of the door frame and ran the wire out the side to come out just before the side. Then it ran down the corner that the door frame made with the wall to the floor. The wire could be hot glued into place, it’s vary thin and hidden once the insolution is in. Ran it then along the floor and up the back of the bulkhead then behind the galley to my breaker panel. I made a round plug that fit into the hole with an overlapping flange all out of wood that allowed me to have a cavity behind it for extra wire and also to screw the lamp into.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)