stevie

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  • in reply to: Here's Mine #2063
    stevie
    Participant

    I epoxied a strip of hardwood that was same length as bunks onto the bunks, making them deeper (or wider if you prefer) by a few inches.  This illustration may help:  www.memphisbagpipes.com/bunks2.jpg

    If graphic doesn’t show up here, copy or type my link onto your browser to view it.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by stevie.
    in reply to: Chocks & Leveling #1188
    stevie
    Participant

    I use two pairs of chocks fabricated from 2×4’s.  Both sides were beveled for a tight fit against the tires.

    A small torpedo level works well for leveling the camper.  It’s stowed away when not in use.  

    And I bolted on a pair of Atwood stabilizers onto the rear of my trailer.  These absolutely were necessary to prevent the camper’s aft off the ground.

    in reply to: Galley hatch locks #1170
    stevie
    Participant

    I like that – very clever.  

    I didn’t believe my single hasp latch was keeping my galley hatch  secured tightly enough.  I found these stainless steel Mizugiwa latches on amazon.com.   Two more galley hasp blocks were necessary, but that was easy enough.  And they will accept a small padlock.

    Here’s where I found them:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LA9Q9RC/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    in reply to: Cabin lighting? #1162
    stevie
    Participant

    I ran an LED strip underneath the shelf.  Another was attached to the top of the hatch trim flange.  The former lights up the interior very well, while the latter provides more subdued illumination.

    Also, I ran an LED strip on the underside of the galley hatch to brighten that area.

    in reply to: Thoughts on mounting window ac on interior bulkhead? #1070
    stevie
    Participant

    I would think it’d make the entire camper vibrate.  Could transmit sound throughout too.

    in reply to: switching between battery power and shore power #1043
    stevie
    Participant

    I use both concurrently.  12v powers the exhaust fan, interior LED illumination, and a USB port.  

    An interior 110v outlet for a fan, TV/DVD, heater, etc.  An exterior outlet was mounted in the galley for convenience.

    I have a battery charger, but haven’t needed to re-juice the 12v battery while camping to date.

    in reply to: Glassing the shell and my OK, not perfect results #1016
    stevie
    Participant

    The cloudiness in the epoxy is called “blush”.  

    Blush can be removed by washing it off with a cloth saturated with undiluted vinegar.  It should disappear with little effort and save a beau coup of sanding.

    Actually it’s more of a chemical reaction and not so much a cleaning of the surface.

    in reply to: Here's Mine #995
    stevie
    Participant

    Yes, I did install longer bolts – 6 inches.  I had to deepen the bunks with strips of oak board in order to clear the trailer’s fenders. Others have used hockey pucks.  My method has served me well.

    I installed them as the manual directed and bolted underneath the trailer.  Your installation will be much stronger if you drill completely thru the trailer rail.

    I bought my ss carriage bolts from amazon.com:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01M2TWNVR/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    in reply to: Bob's tips and tricks #984
    stevie
    Participant

    To facilitate rod engagement, I tapered the ends of mine on a bench grinder.  I figured that would persuade the rods to pass thru the fair leads without hang ups.

    in reply to: Bob's tips and tricks #969
    stevie
    Participant

    Disposable plastic spoons are excellent for spreading fillets into joints.  Work well for mixing epoxy too.

    A Foredom rotary tool was indispensable for me.  More powerful and durable than a Dremel flexshaft.

    I fabricated his & hers cabinets that I mounted on either end of the bulkhead.  The shelf can hold only so much.  They secure personal objects inside the camper too.  Mine are 10″ 12″ x 4″. 

     

    in reply to: Bob's tips and tricks #960
    stevie
    Participant

    Wet a gloved finger (repeatedly) with denatured alcohol to smooth fillets.  The instruction manual mentions it, but after most of the filleting has been completed.

    You’ll hafta wait a bit for the epoxy to cure, but don’t wait too long. I built over the winter months and 2 hours wasn’t uncommon.  Result is really smooth fillets that look professional.  

    in reply to: sanding/dressing the galley hatch and door openings #913
    stevie
    Participant

    Unless your saw kerf is awfully thin, I believe you’ll find the gap just fine. I used the Dremel saw and a Bosch sabre/jig saw for doors and hatch. 

    Some builders stated they had difficulty with the doors rubbing against the eyebrows, but I didn’t.

    in reply to: 'glass and epoxy on the bottom #912
    stevie
    Participant

    I ended up buying another gallon of epoxy to finish my camper.  Didn’t use even half of it though.  Two quarts may’ve been more economical in my situation.  

    I have found a number of uses for the surplus epoxy.  That stuff really can be handy.

    in reply to: 'glass and epoxy on the bottom #906
    stevie
    Participant

    I did only one epoxy fill coat on the bottom and painted it when camper when was 1st supine.  I used a John Deere green paint.  Very durable and easy to match color at a later date if needed.  I painted my trailer with same paint.

    I feared capillary seepage under the painter’s tape and was not disappointed. Switched to a new sash brush to paint bottom sides. Almost no seepage.  Gotta have a steady hand – do it when you’re calm and haven’t been listening to the news.  And some manner of arm support is helpful.  It went fast for me.  Finished the task with roller.

    Once the camper is mounted onto the trailer, it’ll be harder than Chinese algebra to see capillary flow or not.  If you want something really to fret about, try pondering about getting to hatch seals to seal properly and keep galley dry.

    An engineer I know cuts firewood by measuring limbs with an electronic caliper, then cuts to length with an axe.

    in reply to: roundover on the bottom of the TD #900
    stevie
    Participant

    I have an Ultra-Saw too.  Did some trim work just as faithie999 described and the camper and an earlier pirogue build.  Dremel has created a fine tool to have in your collection.

    There is less positive pucker-factor though when using a flush trim bit on the router.  

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 31 total)